COVID-19 RESOURCES

UPDATE: Get on MAC’s new COVID-19 Vaccine Standby List

Mississauga – May 1st, 2021, The Muslim Association of Canada (MAC) is pleased to announce the success of the mobile…

MAC ICCO Vaccination Popup Clinic Registration is Now Closed

MISSISSAUGA – April 27, 2021: Following the announcement on April 24th regarding the partnership of MAC with Peel Public Health…

MAC Launches Its First Mosque Vaccination Popup Clinic with Peel Public Health

MISSISSAUGA- April 24th, 2021: The Muslim Association of Canada (MAC) appreciates the efforts of the Ontario Government and the provincial…

Permissibility of Vaccine and its administration in Ramadan by Dr. Jasser Auda

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم As Canada continues to implement its vaccination rollout plan there are many myths circulating about the…

Statements

Asalamu walaikum wa Rahmatullah dear Brothers and Sisters,

As Canada continues to implement its vaccination rollout plan there are many myths circulating about the vaccine and whether or not it is permissible to take it. Some of these concerns relate to medical issues and others to religious ones.

We would like to clarify the following: Vaccines of different types have helped save millions of lives over the recent decades and have successfully reduced disease transmission at times with a general success rate over 90%. They help preserve life, reduce the severity of the infection and curtail its spread; these are medical facts.

Saving lives is one of the higher objectives of Islam. Allah says: “whoever saves a life – it is as if he had saved humankind entirely” (Quran 5:32).

The process of vaccine approval is methodical involving trusted scientific oversight bodies, and reporting mechanisms are in place even after vaccines are introduced into the public in order to assure continued safety. The Quran commands us to inquire the specialized in the field “(O Muhammad), whenever We raised any Messengers before you, they were no other than human beings; (except that) to them We sent revelation. So, ask those who possess knowledge if you do not know” (Qur’an 16:43)

Allah asks us to trust in his control and dominion over all things whether we perceive them as beneficial or harmful “If Allah afflicts you with any hardship, none other than He can remove it; and if He wills any good for you, none can avert His bounty. He bestows good upon whomsoever of His servants He wills. He is All-Forgiving, All-Merciful.” (Qur’an 10:107).

Muslims should not give in to conspiracy theories regarding this matter.

Herd immunization induced by vaccination programs is touted to be a viable solution by health research leaders and policymakers. Islam’s concern for oneself and one’s neighbours suggests that participation in the immunization process is a laudable act. With the proper intention, the action could accord with the notion of “saving lives” (Quran 5:32).

The Prophet (SAW) was asked about the treatment of various ills and he emphatically encouraged it by saying “Make use of medical treatment, for Allah has not made a disease without appointing a remedy for it, except the old age” (Ibn Majah, Abu Da’ud, Nasa’i, al-Tirmidhi, etc.) The Prophet (SAW) also said “There is a remedy for every malady, and when the remedy is applied to the disease it is cured with the permission of Allah, the Exalted and Glorious.”

Seeking treatment and preventive measures are part of an Islamic moral response while acknowledging the results are assigned to Allah.

According to all Fatwa and Fiqh councils worldwide, there is nothing Haram or Islamically controversial in taking a vaccine, even if there is a trace of alcohol or any other forbidden liquid or solid in it. These forbidden materials in Islam are forbidden to consume orally, rather than to use in injections or for any other useful purpose.

It’s a well-known fact and has been the practice of Muslims all over the world and along the centuries that injections while fasting does not compromise the validity of fasting. It is the opinion of all well-known and widely followed schools of Islamic jurisprudence.

Jazakum Allahu Khairan,

Dr. Jasser Auda

Muslim Association of Canada

There are many rumors and myths circulating about COVID 19 vaccine. Some of them relate to medical issues and others to religious ones. The Fiqh Council of North America likes to lend its voice to clarify the situation. We recognize and affirm the following:

1: Vaccines of different types and mechanisms have helped to save millions of lives over the recent decades and have successfully reduced disease transmission at times with a success rate of over 90%. They help preserve life, reduce the severity of the infection and curtail its spread; these are medical facts.

2: The process of vaccine approval is methodical involving reputable and trusted scientific oversight bodies, and reporting mechanisms are in place even after vaccines are introduced into the public in order to assure continued safety. The Qur’an commands us to inquire the specialized in the field (Qur’an 16:43), and to trust in Allah (SWT)’s control and dominion over all things whether we perceive them as beneficial or harmful (Qur’an 10:107) We do not give in to conspiracy theories of such global magnitude.

3: There are two COVID 19 vaccines that are currently authorized for emergency use in the US manufactured by Pfizer and Moderna respectively. Both are made of proteins, salts and sugars. These materials, according to the pharmaceutical companies, are not taken from any Haram or Islamically controversial source such as porcine, aborted fetuses or stem cells.

4: Both FDA and CDC have approved these two vaccines based upon an unbiased review of the data on effectiveness, and in light of the urgency needed to combat the COVID-19 pandemic which has been a cause of death of millions. The reported cases of allergic reactions to these vaccines are rare and minimal but are being studied and tracked. Such reactions are expected as therapeutics almost always have side effects and can produce allergic reactions. Nonetheless, Islamic law is clear that if the benefits outweigh harms then therapeutics are permitted for use.

5: The pandemic is real; lives have been lost, families have been rent asunder, and individual livelihoods jeopardized. Herd immunization induced by vaccination programs is touted to be a viable solution by health research leaders and policymakers. Islam’s concern for oneself and one’s neighbors suggests that participation in the immunization process is a laudable act. With the proper intention, the action could accord with the notion of ‘saving one life is equal to saving the whole humanity (cf. the Qur’an 5:32).

6: The Prophet (SAW) was asked about the treatment of various ills and he emphatically encouraged it by saying “Make use of medical treatment, for Allah has not made a disease without appointing a remedy for it, except the old age” (Ibn Majah, Abu Da’ud, Nasa’i, al-Tirmidhi, etc.) and also “There is a remedy for every malady, and when the remedy is applied to the disease it is cured with the permission of Allah, the Exalted and Glorious.”(Muslim) Seeking treatment and preventive measures are part of an Islamic moral response while acknowledging the results are assigned to Allah SWT.

7: Both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines use a novel mRNA approach to create vaccines. In this approach, no virus is inserted into the body, yet the body cells are taught to produce a protein that triggers an immune response so that antibodies that fight the disease are created. This technology is relatively new, but current data suggests it is effective and safe. We understand that some would be concerned about long-term side effects, but we trust that no harm can come save for leave from Allah [SWT] and that due diligence is occurring.

In short, after due consultation with our medical experts at Initiative on Islam and Medicine, we at the Fiqh Council consider the above-mentioned two vaccines permissible (Halal) and advise the community to receive COVID vaccines with due consultation with and advice of their physicians. We also ask Muslims to play their role in debunking baseless rumors and myths about the vaccine. Let us perform our duty of enjoining good and stopping evil and facilitate the human transition from this global pandemic to global normalcy. May Allah SWT take this pandemic away from us. Ameen.

In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful

Vaccination During the Month of Ramadan

A question that is being posed by many Muslims is the permissibility of getting the vaccine administered during the month of Ramadan and whether or not that would break someone’s fast.

The vaccine in question being administered to fight against Covid19 is an intramuscular injection. The wildly accepted opinion regarding any type of vaccine is that it does not break one’s fast regardless of whether the vaccination is intravenous, intramuscular or under the skin. This is due to the fact that the vaccination is not to be taken orally and it does not reach the stomach or enter the mouth. The vaccination is therefore not contrary to the meaning of fasting, neither in its linguistic nor Islamic legal meaning. The different Fatwa committees and other Fatwa committees follow this opinion. In the case of feeling weak during or after taking the vaccine while fasting it is permissible for the ill person to break their fast at the advice of their health care provider and make up the day at a later time in the year before the next Ramadan. This is a common practice for those that need medication or are too ill to fast during the Holy Month. The termination of fasting can be justified if the person is unable to for many different circumstances including disease, travel, and pregnancy or breastfeeding; Allah the Sublime says: ′′ Whoever of you is sick or on a journey, a number of other days will apply ′′ (Surah 2: verse 184).

We ask Allah SWT to ease the difficulty of the pandemic for all mankind. We ask that He will make us successful in fasting, our nightly prayers and any good deeds we may achieve in Ramadan. All praise belongs to Allah, the Lord of the worlds.

The Fatwa Committee in Germany

Frequently Asked Questions

Below you can find frequently asked questions regarding the COVID-19 test and vaccine. If you have additional questions about the vaccine that you would like us to answer, please send them to mac@macnet.ca and common questions, particularly those around Islamic rulings, will be posted here with a response Inshallah.

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are made of proteins, salts and sugars. These materials, according to the pharmaceutical companies, are not taken from any Haram or Islamically controversial source such as porcine, aborted fetuses or stem cells. (FCNA) Furthermore, there is nothing Haram or Islamically controversial in taking a vaccine, even if there is a trace of alcohol or any other forbidden liquid or solid in it. These forbidden materials in Islam are forbidden to consume orally, rather than to use in injections or for any other useful purpose. (Dr. Jasser Auda)

It’s a well-known fact and has been the practice of Muslims all over the world and over the centuries that injections while fasting do not compromise the validity of fasting. It is the opinion of all well-known and widely followed schools of Islamic jurisprudence. (Dr. Jasser Auda)

In the case of feeling weak during or after taking the vaccine while fasting it is permissible for the ill person to break their fast at the advice of their health care provider and make up the day at a later time in the year before the next Ramadan.  (The Fatwa Committee in Germany)

Saving lives is one of the higher objectives of Islam. Allah says: “whoever saves a life – it is as if he had saved humankind entirely” (Quran 5:32). Seeking treatment and preventive measures are part of an Islamic moral response while acknowledging that the results are assigned to Allah. (Dr. Jasser Auda).

In particular, there are two COVID 19 vaccines that are currently authorized for use manufactured by Pfizer and Moderna respectively. Both are made of proteins, salts and sugars. These materials, according to the pharmaceutical companies, are not taken from any Haram or Islamically controversial source such as porcine, aborted fetuses or stem cells. (FCNA Statement about COVID Vaccines).

Furthermore, and according to all Fatwa and Fiqh councils worldwide, there is nothing Haram or Islamically-controversial in taking a vaccine, even if there is a trace of alcohol or any other forbidden liquid or solid in it. These forbidden materials in Islam are forbidden to consume orally, rather than to use in injections or for any other useful purpose. (Dr. Jasser Auda)

A ‘awrah is a concept that does not exist in the English language but could be translated as a private body part that must be covered. It is a well-established fatwa from all contemporary Fiqh and Fatwa councils that a ‘awrah (for a man or a woman) could be exposed for medical purposes. This applies to medication as well as vaccination. (Dr. Jasser Auda)

No, getting a covid swab does not break your fast as the dry screening tool does not reach the throat, does not settle in it, and does not carry a substance that travels to the throat or stomach. (The Fatwa Committee in Germany, Arabic)

Only vaccines that are proven to be safe, effective and of high quality are authorized for use in Canada. The COVID-19 vaccines have been rigorously tested during their development and then carefully reviewed by Health Canada. The vaccines cannot give you COVID-19 because they don’t contain the virus that causes it. The vaccines also cannot change your DNA.  (Canada.ca)

While the vaccines are over 90% effective, there is a possibility that you may still get COVID after being vaccinated (Ontario.ca).  Because of this, it’s essential that everyone continue to follow public health measures to help stop the spread of COVID-19 in our communities (Gov. Of Canada https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19/vaccines/what-expect-vaccination.html#a5).

Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. This can reduce your risk of developing COVID-19 and make your symptoms milder if you do get it. (Ontario.ca)

No. People with COVID-19 who have symptoms should wait to be vaccinated until they have recovered from their illness and have completed their isolation period; those without symptoms should also wait until they have completed their isolation before getting vaccinated. This guidance also applies to people who get COVID-19 before getting their second dose of vaccine. (Ontario.ca)

The COVID-19 vaccines produce protection against the disease, as a result of developing an immune response to the COVID-19. Developing immunity through vaccination means there is a reduced risk of developing the illness and its consequences. This immunity helps you fight the virus if exposed. Getting vaccinated may also protect people around you, because if you are protected from getting infected and from disease, you are less likely to infect someone else. This is particularly important to protect people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, such as healthcare providers, older or elderly adults, and people with other medical conditions. (WHO)

Staying Safe

Everything you need to know about Staying Safe from COVID-19 can be found here. Until vaccines are more widely available it is imperative that you wear a mask when out in public while maintaining a distance of 2 meters (6 ft).

Covid-19 has many symptoms that are indicators of the virus. Going to get tested and self-isolating for 14 days can reduce the spread of the disease.

If you have 1 or more of these key symptoms, seek testing as soon as possible:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Loss of sense of smell or taste
  • Difficulty breathing

If you have 2 or more of the symptoms below for more than 24 hours, and they are not related to any other pre-existing conditions, seek testing.

  • Sore throat
  • Loss of appetite
  • Extreme fatigue or tiredness
  • Headache
  • Body aches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

A COVID-19 test is also recommended if you are a contact of someone who tested positive for COVID-19 and you have even one of the following COVID-19 symptoms:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Loss of sense of smell or taste
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of appetite
  • Extreme fatigue or tiredness
  • Headache
  • Body aches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

 

If you start to show any of the Covid-19 symptoms you should:

Go to an assessment centre in Ontario: https://covid-19.ontario.ca/assessment-centre-locations

Go to an assessment centre in Quebec: https://cv19quebec.ca/s/?language=en_CA&flow=asymptomatic

Go to an assessment centre in Alberta: https://myhealth.alberta.ca/Journey/COVID-19/Pages/COVID-Self-Assessment.aspx

Go to an assessment centre in British Columbia: https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/3862560c5a41418e9d78f4f81688e9d0

Vaccination Facts

Vaccines approved for use in Canada and their benefit/risk profile are outlined below. While we do not recommend any one vaccine over another; this page is to help community members make an informed choice based on the science of available options.

To learn more about Moderna click here

To learn more about Pfizer click here

To learn more about AstraZeneca click here

To learn more about Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) click here

Vaccination Hubs

MAC Centers

MAC is offering the use of its community centers in different cities as MAC Vaccination Hubs in coordination with local health units. This section will be updated with MAC’s vaccination hubs are open.

Ontario

ICCO (2550 Dunwin Dr, Mississauga, ON L5L 1T1)

April 30 – May 11 (appointments fully booked)

Clinic Hours:

Friday April 30 – Saturday May 1:  from 12pm to 5pm

Sunday May 2nd :  from 3pm to 11pm

Monday May 3rd  – Thursday May 6 : from 11am to 7pm

Friday May 7 – Sunday May 9 : from 3pm to 11pm

Monday May 10 – Tuesday May 11: from  11am to 7pm

Other Vaccination Hubs

You may find Vaccine Hubs in your region below. Simply put in your postal code and the vaccine hubs closest to you will be shown.

Vaccines for COVID-19: How to get vaccinated or register – Canada.ca

Use the Ontario weblink here

Use the B.C. weblink here

Use the Alberta weblink here

Use the Quebec weblink here

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